Super Commuters

Sydney Dinkeloo & Lisa Maloney, Yale Administration
They work in different Yale departments and live in different Connecticut towns, but Carmen Cusmano, Rosemary Rubsam and Barbara Corcoran have one thing in common: they all commute to work by train. While their reasons for commuting differ slightly, they agree on a few things: riding the train saves money, is environmentally friendly, and is a great way to start the morning.
Brianne Mullen, Yale Office of Sustainability
If you drive to work every day, you may not think about the impact that it has on your health (lack of exercise, reduced air quality), wallet (car payments, insurance, gas, wear and tear on your vehicle), and environment (greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants). It may be time for a lifestyle change to shake things up a bit and start to “think outside the car.” These three Super Commuters have done just that, taking advantage of a career change, a change in weather, and a surprise gift to start a healthier and more sustainable commute.
Brianne Mullen, Yale Office of Sustainability
The Yale Office of Sustainability lives and breathes the idea of a greener more sustainable world – and the staff’s commuting habits are no exception. Although they are spread out across different neighborhoods and cities, these seven Super Commuters manage to save money, improve their health, and reduce their environmental impact by walking, biking, or riding the shuttle, bus, or train to work. Many of them live close to the downtown office location, taking advantage of short commutes and the convenience of nearby restaurants, shops, and other perks.
Michael Madera, Yale Mail Service
David Backeberg has a hectic schedule. With a full-time job and married with two young children, his day is busy. Besides his work life, he is also responsible for dropping off and picking up his two children at pre-school and even fits in a lunch-time run. With such an active schedule, Backeberg is in high-speed mode all day. For most of us, needing a car to quickly facilitate errands and the daily commute is essential. That is not the case for David and his family.
Lisa Maloney, Yale Administration
Meet the super-commuting power couple Meriam and Brad Worzella. They have been taking the train from Madison (or carpooling) together for about 12 years.
Christian Vazquez
Lou Rinaldi rides the Shore Line East from Guilford every morning. Although his commute takes a little under an hour compared to the thirty minutes it takes him when he drives from home, he prefers taking public transit to get to his Science Park office. “Other than the slightly longer commute, taking the Shore Line East is definitely much better,” said Lou who works in the Academic IT Solutions unit of ITS.
Christian Vazquez
Lisa Ford has not owned a car since 1996. To travel between her home in East Rock to the Yale Center for British Art she either walks or uses the Yale Shuttle. “I’m a bit of a heretic for a Californian,” said Lisa, who is Associate Head of Research at the Yale Center for British Art.
Holly Parker
In her now seven-plus years of biking around New Haven, Cristin Siebert feels that “generally people are more used to bikers. In the beginning, I felt like there weren’t that many of us.” Though she wishes there were [more] proper bike lanes, she thinks New Haven is becoming more of a bike town.
Holly Parker
“What’s said in the carpool stays in the carpool.” Such is the “cone of silence” in the carpool transporting Martha Highsmith, Keri Enright-Kato, Jo Cohen, Bill Hathaway, Dan Jones, and Pilar Asensio-Manrique from West Hartford to Yale’s campus.
Christian Vazquez
Susan Abramson is a living, breathing example of how flexible work arrangements bring work and life into balance.